“Volunteers ready to protect, serve” – Frederick News Post, May 7th, 1997

By Kate Leckie, News-Post Staff

Twenty more feet will be policing the streets, as Frederick Police Department held graduation exercises Tuesday night for its first group of volunteer officers.

The 10 members of the Uniform Volunteer Auxiliary won’t carry a gun, but they will wear uniforms. And they’ll be jumping into the law enforcement arena by doing such chores as directing traffic, keeping an eye on homes whose residents are out of town and assisting people who get locked out of their cars.

“The auxiliary epitomizes what community policing is all about,” said Police Chief Ray Raffensberger.

“I can’t say enough about volunteers. By committing to this program, these people are taking time out of their busy lives to contribute to the quality of life of all citizens of Frederick. They do it for a cause, a desire, a want to serve their community,” Maj. Raffensberger said.

The news volunteer officers range in age from 23 to 73 and include a school teacher, an engineer, a volunteer firefighter and a national guardsman.

Amanda Kochansky, 23, already has applications out for a career in law enforcement. “That’s a big 10-4,” said the enthusiastic auxiliary graduate, who also will graduate from Hood College on May 17 with her degree in law and society.

Previously an Explorer Scout, she’s also been working as a security guard, “and becoming a volunteer officer sounded good to me. I can help out the community even more.”

David Stone, 63, who retired after a longtime career with State Farm Insurance, said: “I had the time and my wife’s endorsement, so here I am. We will be able to do chores for the paid officers, some things back at the officer, that will allow them to stay on the streets where they belong. Maybe if we can impress some people, we can get more volunteers in the system.”

Although the volunteer officers won’t be making arrests, “they will be fulfilling some very real aspects of police work,” Officer Kundrat said.

The volunteers are required to do a minimum of eight hours of work a month, he said.

Joining Ms. Kochansky and Mr. Stone as graduates of the first auxiliary class were Thomas F. Colliflower Jr., Allen J. Dysin, Martin D. Holt, Jack L. Kessell II, Paul E. Schatzle, Sion Monnikendam, Laurence J. Vermer and Guy C. Whiddon.

Jim Robbins, advisor to the latest group of the police department’s Explorer Scouts, was honred for turning around Post 714’s program, which also awarded certificates to eight Scouts on Tuesday night: Sarah Bromfield, Andy Crone, Thomas Hoffman, Darren Mayhew, Scott Miller, Lacey Rishkind, David Sandy and Joan Wisnieski.

“You’ve witnessed history being made today,” Lt. Garry Hoyle of the Community Services Section said to a large crowd of family members and city officials gathered at the Elks Lodge for the ceremony and a reception.

Frederick Mayor Jim Grimes thanked the graduates “for their tremendous gift of time, the most priceless gift an individual can give.”

 

 


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